Toilet training your new puppy!

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Toilet training will be the first bit of ‘training’ you do with your new pup. If you have cats you’ll know how easy it is with kittens. In fact normally by the end of their first day home they know where their litter tray is and how to use it. Of course there are occasional accidents, but it’s pretty much a doddle.

Dogs are another kettle of fish! The only place puppies really know not to pee, is their bed or anywhere they sleep. Everywhere else is fair game. What’s more, they can’t hold their bladder and bowels for very long and will pretty much need to go the minute they have a drink or something to eat and every 20 minutes or so in between!

The key to toilet training is learning the signals that your puppy needs to go and putting them outside quickly. But also putting them outside every half an hour even if they don’t show you those signals, just in case! So you pretty much need eyes in the back of your head to make sure you are on it!

Sounds easy right? Nope. Your new puppy will have lots of accidents in those first few weeks. And it’s important to remember that word, ‘accident’, because you it’s the only way you will temper the frustration when you think you’ve nailed it and then step in a little gift left for you! Toilet training takes time and patience, and when these accidents occur it’s important not to reprimand your puppy – they didn’t do it on purpose.

The flip side is praise, and lots of it. Every poo and wee they do outside should be met with a fanfare of praise and even a treat! But one of the best pieces of advice I received was not just to praise after the event. While they are peeing or pooing, have a phrase you intend to use in future when you let them outside and want them to do their business. Ours is ‘Go potty!’ which we said repeatedly while she squatted to pee. She now knows when we open the door and say ‘Go potty!’ that it’s time to ‘go’! It can be any phrase, but whatever you choose, be consistent and repeat it until they have stopped peeing or pooing and then follow with praise.

“Go potty!”

So now let’s talk about puppy training pads. We started using these as we had been advised to by quite a few dog owners. The idea is that you put the pad on the floor and train your puppy to go on the pad to avoid the mess. But here’s the issue (which, once explained to me, made perfect sense): if you want your puppy to pee outside, why are you training it to pee inside on a mat? Good question, right? It’s only going to prolong what for some new owners is already a long process. So, my advice would be not to use puppy training pads.

Next up, night time toilet trips. As mentioned before, puppies cannot hold their bladders for very long, so you will need to get up in the night to begin with to let them out to pee. We found that Ivy could hold for much longer at night, so the 20 minute rule does not apply at night. Within a week Ivy was sleeping through, however this does not mean the frequency during the day got less. I am not sure why that is, although puppies do hate to make a mess in their bed more than anything. And we found that crate-training was what nailed the night time bladder control. If she had been able to wonder round, she would have had accidents. But because she was all cosy in her crate, she didn’t.

So the secret is consistency, patience and taking ownership of the process. Potty training is your job, not your puppy’s. You need to realise it will take time for this little bundle of fluff to understand that his or her human wants him to go to the bathroom outside rather than inside. And it will take you time to recognise the signals that tell you your puppy needs to go.

So, what are those signals? When Ivy needs to pee, she starts turning in circles and when she needs to poo, she sniffs the floor while walking around. If you see your pup doing either of these things, pick them up and take them outside. When you take your puppy outside, again, you need to be patient… and boring! Puppy will instantly forget it needed to pee when faced with all those fabulous smells and sounds and the expectation that you are going to play with them! So stand still, don’t speak and wait. When she starts to go, you start saying your chosen phrase, ‘Go potty! Go potty! Go potty’ (seriously, you don’t need to say that particular one, it just makes us laugh for some reason!) And then when she has gone, lots of praise.

You will hear tales of some puppies being trained by 9 weeks. Don’t listen. Yes, it can be done, but very few people manage it that quickly. Every puppy is different and some take longer than others. Ivy was getting the hang of it by 22 weeks, but unusual circumstances or forgetfulness on our part still results in the occasional accident.

One aspect of toilet training that isn’t often discussed is the ‘clean up’. It’s really important to clean up thoroughly when your puppy has an accident. Puppy wee doesn’t really smell strong to humans, but to your puppy, even the tiniest residue will mark a spot where they will look to wee again. So, make sure you find a good cleaning solution to get rid of the scent of wee or poo.

And on that sweet note… we would love to hear of any top tips you have learned through your experience with toilet training, so feel free to leave a comment below!

Sadie and Coco meet Ivy..

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The prospect of introducing Ivy to our cats Coco and Sadie was almost certainly the most nerve-wracking aspect of getting a puppy. I mean let’s face it, dogs and cats are the most notorious of adversaries. And while I’m a sucker for pictures of cats and dogs snuggled in perfect harmony on Facebook (see above), I was under no illusions that this was going to be an instant cat/dog love-fest!

And I was right! Ivy’s first encounters with either cat was brief.. very brief! Ivy would spot Coco or Sadie, her little tail would begin to wag and her eyes light up at the prospect of a new playmate. Her absolute confidence that they would feel the same way saw her bounding across the garden to greet them, only for them to leap 10 feet into the air, turn tail and scarper as fast as their furry feline feet would carry them!

Our house is on four floors and we have placed a gate on at the bottom of the stairs to the top two floors, thus providing a safe haven for Coco and Sadie when they lose patience with Ivy (they seem to spend quite a lot of time up there.. just sayin’!) That said, they do seem to enjoy taunting her by sitting on the step just above the stair gate staring and then staring some more, driving her into a frenzy! Such fun!

We have now reached a state of.. I’m not sure I can call it peace and harmony, but I suppose ‘acceptance’ would be the best word to describe it. At least on the part of Coco and Sadie. They have learned that if Ivy is in the kitchen, the best way to cross the room to their food or the cat flap is up high. So they leap from table to chair to kitchen work surface – pretty impressive as it happens. And yes, I do see the irony of having spent two years trying to get them NOT to go on the work surfaces, now actively encouraging it!

Coco, who is a little dot of a cat, knows exactly how to put Ivy in her place. A carefully timed hiss and a flick of a sharp claw does the trick. Sadie simply C…B…A (‘can’t be arsed’ according to son Noah!). Ivy will chase her and she lollops away slowly to the safest spot.. but she takes her time. I am not sure ‘lollops’ is even a word, but it seems to be quite descriptive of Sadie’s gait. So the cats ‘get it’ – this ‘thing’ is here to stay and avoidance is key. Ivy not so much. Ever the optimist, she will bark and chase when she sees either cat – she just wants to play!

I sometimes wonder what the cats are thinking. Do they blame us for this new intruder? I don’t think so. They are still as affectionate as ever. Like I said, I think ‘acceptance’ pretty much sums it up. I do wonder more of a bond will form when Ivy calms down a bit.. but I’m not holding my breath!

Ivy the puppy – a baptism of fire

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Life with a new puppy… where to begin? There are quite a few things you need to get used to when you welcome a new puppy into your life, most of which you simply will not have anticipated!

Obsessive photo taking

Anyone would have thought we were gunning for a place in the 2019 edition of the Guinness Book of Records for the most photos taken in one day! She’s sitting – snap. She’s standing – snap. She’s running  – snap. She’s sleeping – She’s done a poo – ok, we did draw a line there, but that first poo did not go unremarked upon! And I must admit to having taken a picture of one of her poos, because it looked like a Stonehenge statue, but I have been expressly forbidden by the whole family to share it, even tho’ I know you might be desperate to see it!

 

Sudden popularity

Seriously! You’d think there was a sudden world caffeine shortage, the number of friends who suddenly wanted to ‘pop over for a coffee’ – more than ever wanted to come and see our offspring when they were born! I guess watching a new puppy bombing round the garden and generally being adorable is a bit more interesting than watching a baby sleep, but still!

 

Complete chaos

By day two or three, our kitchen began to resemble a crêche. Brightly coloured balls and toys scattered all over the floor. A wire pen surrounding her night time cage. Paw prints on the glass doors and floor. Wee mats, like so many discarded diapers. Just mess everywhere!

 

Poop and wee

E.V.E.R.Y.W.H.E.R.E! Yes we knew this was going to happen, but seriously how many times a day can one small furry creature empty its bladder and bowels!

 

Who spilled the super glue?

Someone has definitely applied superglue to our new puppy. Wherever we are, so is she. If you move, she needs to know where you are going. When you leave the room, she follows. When I am making supper, if I stand still more than five seconds, she comes and lies on my feet, ever hopeful I won’t move and she can fall asleep! And don’t talk to me about trying to go for a wee alone!

 

Cuteness overload

Ivy is undoubtedly gorgeous. A whirling bundle of fur who just wants to have fun and cuddles. Every morning she greets us as if we have been parted for months – I don’t think we have ever been showered with such unbridled affection!

 

We are all in love!

 

Bringing home Ivy

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The day has arrived! Dylan and I are the chosen ones. At 11am one Saturday morning the two of us head off to pick up our new bundle of joy. We are beyond excited and more than a little nervous. Will she like us? Will she cry? How’s her mum going to feel? Will she pee in the car? When will she first eat? You get the picture!

I should point out at this stage that none of us have ever owned a dog. Yes, we had done a lot of research and reading around. Yes, we have lots of friends who have dogs. And yes, we feel well and truly prepared. But as anyone who has ever brought home an 8 week old puppy will know – we did not know what was about to hit us!

We turned up at the farm and were met by the lovely breeder Louise. We stayed for coffee while she gave us some tips, the best one being “Don’t overthink it!“. A bit late for that, but as I was about to learn, there really is no point in overthinking because you just don’t know what you’re going to get. Yes, certain breeds have particular traits, but every puppy is different and every puppy develops at a different rate. Fooling yourself into thinking that you can be totally in control is simply not worth it.

Once we had everything we needed, including some food Ivy was used to eating, we got in the car and drove off. It’s hard to describe the feeling. I think ‘vulnerable’ probably does the job. We suddenly felt so protective of this little bundle of fluff who was not only being separated from her mum, but also her three siblings. And she was now 100% dependent on us. Gulp!

When we got her home, we put her into the garden and she did her first wee! That’s potty training nailed then… NOT!!

She had a lot of visitors on the first day. On the one hand I was a little nervous it might be too much for her, but on the other, the most prominent advice for those first few days and weeks was making sure she was well socialised. Well, we definitely ticked that box.

And so, the sun set on our first day with Ivy and our first night loomed.

I had set up her crate in the sitting room for the first night and put a pen around it so she could go in and out to pee and poo, but not roam. My plan was to ‘sleep’ on the sofa to keep her company (I shall just wait for the laughter to die down before I proceed). I turned out the light and the crying commenced. Poor little Ivy was not happy. To be fair, she settled after about 20 minutes, but every time she needed to go to the toilet, it began again.

Suffice to say, not a lot of sleep was had and by 6 in the morning I was sitting in the garden with a cup of tea wrapped in a blanket while she pottered around. I sat there thinking that there’s something very special about being up and outside so early in the morning while everyone else is asleep. Not so special that I wouldn’t have rather been tucked up in bed catching up on some sleep, but watching Ivy diddle around our garden did make me truly happy.

And so the first 24 hours had passed. Ivy seemed happy and our confidence was already growing. This was going to be a breeze!

Preparing for our new bundle of joy!

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We couldn’t be more excited about the arrival of our new puppy. Obviously we can’t wait to get our hands on her little fluffy body, but the prospect of going out and buying all the necessaties is also pretty exciting. Exciting, interesting and downright mind boggling. It will also, I am now beginning to realise, be an exercise in extreme self control!

Apart from the obvious practical items such as a bed, food bowls and so on, there’s a baffling and tempting array of items we could buy… but perhaps shouldn’t! Obviously I want everything – she’s our new baby – and who doesn’t like to shop? Oh wait! Both my sons and my husband hate shopping. It’s all up to me then! Yay!

As I browse the puppy shelves in our local pet store, I keep hoping someone will come – not least because I just want to shout to the world we are getting a puppy. It was with great reluctance I put back the pink diamante collar and lead I had chosen – first because it was ludicrously expensive and secondly because I anticipate the flat refusal of Dylan (17) and Noah (14) to walk the dog sporting bright pink bling, no matter how gorgeous I think she looks! Fair! Likewise the pink puffa coat went back on the shelf.. sigh.

“I just want to shout to the world we are getting a puppy.”

I do, however, get a bright pink shiny dog tag for her collar with our surname, phone number engraved on one side and the fact that she is micro-chipped on the other. The shop assistant helpfully stops me from putting her name on there too – apparently it makes them easier to steal, which makes sense.

Next stop, toy shelf! Wow! Most of these toys are better than those my kids had as toddlers! And I suspect many will be as readily ignored! Still, she’s really going to need that squeaky donut and you can’t go wrong with a few balls either. Someone once told me puppies like to have a soft toy to cuddle. I remember snorting with disbelief at the time, but I now find myself fondling a particularly soft and cuddly bear. Just in time I remind myself of the number of once previously loved and now discarded soft toys we have gathering dust at home and put it back. I am soooooo strong!

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And so with a basket full of goodies – food, snacks, chews, balls, toys, collar, lead, bed and the rest – I make my way to the checkout and try to ignore the groaning of my credit card as I cough up the best part of £150! And I have no doubt, in the words of the great Arnold Schwarzenegger, “I’ll be back!”